A “Rare” Series of Kodak Retina II

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This time I want to talk a little about the Kodak Retina II (Typ 011). A camera (for the era in which it was built) high performance. Indeed, it was equipped with a coupled rangefinder and a Schneider Kreuznach Xenon 50 mm f/2 lens. What makes a bit special the copy in my possession is a small white triangle (which means not coated) between marks that identify the lens  and which is present only in a small number of copies, produced in Germany during 1948 for the domestic market. Of course this is only a little curiosity that adds nothing to the value of the camera itself, if not from the historical point of view.

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Leica M2, Voigtlander Color Skopar & Ilford Delta: A Good Job!

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Okay, it was a bit of time that I don’t propose one of my “mixed salads”, in which I put too many ingredients … and therefore, risk bad results. Yeah, because when there are too many elements (with whom you have little or no  experience) in the game, it becomes difficult to avoid mistakes. However, this time, I am definitely satisfied: everything went well, and each element has worked to perfection, leading to impressive results … as of course, you can judge by yourself looking at pictures.

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Kuribayashi Petri Rangefinder Test

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About a year ago, I saw a beautiful and unusual rangefinder in a Facebook group. Of course, I had to get it immediately and, fortunately, I found one in good condition at a great price. The Kuribayashi Petri infact,  is a rather rare camera Japan made around 1957-1961 but in Japan, it’s still possible to find some good specimen. Equipped with a fixed Orrikor Color Corrected Super 45mm f / 2.8 lens and a central leaf shutter Carperu MXV with speeds from 1 sec. to 1/500 sec. + B, and it is really built like a tank!

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Caput Mundi – Lomography Color negative 400 Test

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Generally (and you can see it all in this blog) I prefer to shoot with film in black and white. Both from the point of view of personal expression and because I believe that is easier and cheaper to self-develop b/w instead of color. Occasionally, however, (you may have noticed this too) I like to take some color photos. I do not have so much experience in this regard, having only used the Kodak Ultramax 400 35mm and a couple of Fujifilm (Pro 400H and Reala 100) in medium format.

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The DDR Power – Exa Ia

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Many film photography fans are fascinated by cameras (and lenses) produced behind the so-called Iron Curtain, in countries of the former Warsaw Pact. The DDR (or GDR) between them has created brands as Ihagee, Praktica, Pentacon (which has absorbed the first), synonymous with high quality construction mechanics, along with names such as Carl Zeiss Jena, Meyer-Optik and the same Pentacon with lenses even at the highest level of quality. Speaking of cameras, robustness is one of the main qualities. The reliability of the models built in eastern Germany is also much higher than that of her contemporaries and even valid Soviet models. It is not uncommon then, to come across more than fifty years old cameras, which seem to come from the factory today and fully functional.

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Unwanted Lomography

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Recently, I’m testing some interesting cameras from the Voigtlander Vito Series. In particular, I took a couple of rolls with the Vito Clr. I have to say that this is a rather “unlucky” camera. In fact, during the development of the first roll I had a light leak, due to a broken seal in the  Rondinax and the second roll once developed, I realized that the film was suddenly dragging “crazy” giving random uneven spacing. I will describe in greater detail in another post the Clr, but for now, I wanted to dedicate this one to the random overlapping frames. Involuntary diptychs and triptychs, in perfect Lomography style …… Well, it could be worse! 😉

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Voigtlander Vitoret Test

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Voigtlander is another of the names that made the history of photography. It produced many cameras and lenses with the classic German quality. Models such as the Avus and Bessa folding, or the whole Vito series (with various Vaskar, Lanthar, Skopar and Ultron lenses) are well known to fans. The brand still exists but it is not the original manufacturer.

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By the Sea – Contax 159mm Test

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Today it is raining so, instead of going out to photograph (that is the thing I love the most), better stay dry and write a nice post on my blog. This time we’ll talk about a high-end camera …. lent by a friend (yes, the same one who gave me the Leica R5) for this test. Some general thoughts before strating: the history of photography, especially of lenses, before the advent of Japanese ones, was made almost entirely by two brands: Zeiss and Leica. Two houses that have marked the mass diffusion of 35mm photography and  in the case of Zeiss, also of medium and large format.

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The Christmas post: Zeiss Ikon Contessamat SBE & Adox CHS II

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In this Christmas post I want to begin by thanking the thousands of readers who have been kind enough to follow my blog. Being able to reach and share my experiences with people of every continent is to me, a source of pleasure and pride. Personally, I learned (and still do) a lot from the many blogs on the web about analogue photography. I could see countless photos, evaluate the results of many different pairs of cameras / lenses / films / developments and get an idea before i can do it myself. Sharing is caring … is an important concept, and I wanted to give the humble contribution of my experiences, sure it could be (sooner or later) useful to someone in the world. The results achieved in such a short time (less than 9 months) confirm and encourage me to continue on this path.

This time, the subject of my post is the Zeiss Ikon Contessamat SBE loaded with  Adox CHS II ISO 100, from which the film was practically … perfect!

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Back to the past: Olympus OM 10 & Efke Kb 100 Test

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This time, a (rare) good deal found on a market stall, took me back in time to the year 1980 … In fact, I bought then an Olympus OM 10, with its manual adapter and standard 50 mm Zuiko lens. But, being a penniless student, I could not afford more Zuiko lenses, so I got a 28mm (can’t remember the brand) vignetting like an..Holga! But this time, the OM 10 came with its Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 and also with a Zuiko 28mm f/2.8. All in perfect condition. Since I had to test a roll of Efke KB 100 expired recently … what better opportunity to take a dip into the past?

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