CANON EOS 55 QD – IN THE LAND OF HEARTQUAKES (Part Two) – Trix pushed @ 800

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As mentioned in the previous post on the Canon 55 Qd, I went back after a year, in some of the places affected by the disastrous earthquake of 2009 in L’Aquila. This time, I used the camera with the 50mm f/1.8 II lens in some locations where the light was very poor. That’s why I had to push the Kodak Trix @ 800 Iso and in spite of that, in some cases, I had to use very slow speeds handheld. The results, however, do not seem despicable at all.

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Canon Eos 55 Qd – In the land of Heartquakes (Part One)

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Lately I published very few posts on this blog. For various reasons I didn’t use film during the first months of this year, but I’m going to get it back, so I’m starting here a series of posts where I will talk about two Canon slrs, used with different films and lenses. The Eos 3000n canon has already been known on these “pages”, while today I propose the Eos 55 Qd. Recently, I returned to L’Aquila for the official presentation of the State of Things, the great collective project of documentary and social photography to which I had the honor and the pleasure of attending (I warmly invite you to check it). I have returned to places of suffering that has been going on for nearly 8 years, renewed since last August by the new earthquake swarm that hit the central Apennines.

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Ferrania Eura: The Italian Holga

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Ferrania is a brand that all Italians of a certain age know, at least also in name only, because until the ’70s the advertising signs and neon signs appeared often in alignment with the photographers “shops” even in the remotest villages. Who then did not use at these times at least one Ferrania film roll? In short, it was kind of our local Kodak. Currently, this brand has returned to the attention of analogue photography enthusiasts with a crowdfunding operation to reactivate the film production lines once famous both in Italy and abroad. Anyway, is not the film that I want to speak about here, but a medium format camera: Ferrania Eura. Built since 1959/early ’60s, the Eura was a kind of Italian Holga, but made in a more refined and reliable way as well, with a decidedly higher level design.

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