Kuribayashi Petri Rangefinder Test

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About a year ago, I saw a beautiful and unusual rangefinder in a Facebook group. Of course, I had to get it immediately and, fortunately, I found one in good condition at a great price. The Kuribayashi Petri infact,  is a rather rare camera Japan made around 1957-1961 but in Japan, it’s still possible to find some good specimen. Equipped with a fixed Orrikor Color Corrected Super 45mm f / 2.8 lens and a central leaf shutter Carperu MXV with speeds from 1 sec. to 1/500 sec. + B, and it is really built like a tank!

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The DDR Power – Exa Ia

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Many film photography fans are fascinated by cameras (and lenses) produced behind the so-called Iron Curtain, in countries of the former Warsaw Pact. The DDR (or GDR) between them has created brands as Ihagee, Praktica, Pentacon (which has absorbed the first), synonymous with high quality construction mechanics, along with names such as Carl Zeiss Jena, Meyer-Optik and the same Pentacon with lenses even at the highest level of quality. Speaking of cameras, robustness is one of the main qualities. The reliability of the models built in eastern Germany is also much higher than that of her contemporaries and even valid Soviet models. It is not uncommon then, to come across more than fifty years old cameras, which seem to come from the factory today and fully functional.

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Ilford XP2 400 Super & Adonal (Rodinal)

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Some time ago, stimulated by certain images seen on the net, I wanted to try the Ilford XP2 Super 400 film. This stems from the XP1, which appeared in the early ’80s to make more widespread treatment of b/w and to provide less grain than other films of these times (which often had too much of it). I must have somewhere a series of negatives taken with the XP1 ….. The XP2 must be developed by the classic C-41, used routinely for color films. This could have been a major point in its favor, at least until the advent of the digital era.

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Thirty years after

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Something happened last year.

After more than 10 years of full digital commitment, running around faster and faster and shooting millions of (often completely useful and meaningless) images, simply I couldn’t go on anymore. Until then I would never had thought to use film photography again for the rest of my life.

I was wrong!

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