End of the year post: Praktica Bc1

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It has been a long and intense year, the one that is about to end. This blog has grown thanks to the many readers around the world. Many things have happened and others will shortly happen. The most important was the Darkroom I built, where finally be able to print the best shots made with film. Soon, I will also print using ancient techniques, such as Platinum/Palladium and Cyanotype, when will be ready the U.V. contact printer that I’m building. Thanks to contact printing, I’ll be able to better use large format cameras too. Already a couple (M.P.P. Mark VIII 4″x 5″ and Reality so Subtle pinhole 4″x 5″) are already waiting to be used. But it will also, print (via internegative) images from digital files. So even intangible electronic images will become real. This post by the end of the year is dedicated to another East Europe’s camera, but this time it is not only manual, but electronics controlled with aperture priority exposure: the Praktica Bc1.

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Darkroom… in progress.

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After more than two years since I started using film again, the inability to print my negs was becoming unbearable. Unfortunately I do not have any usable space in the house and I do not like at all the “flying solutions”. So I was  almost resigned to not being able to have my own darkroom for a long time yet. Recently, however, while they were undergoing some work in my garden, I decided to convert an old storage room into something more substantial masonry … and use it as a Darkroom, although devoid of running water (too difficult and expensive to achieve an appropriate plant).

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Printing Time! Adox CMS 20 in Ars Imago Fd

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As described in the second post of this blog, I recently made an “hazardous” test with a film (Adox CMS 20) rather difficult to treat, even with its dedicated developer. The test was done at box speed (ISO 20) and as developer, I used the Ars Imago-Fd. The negatives were rather “hard” and contrasted, though (at least when scanning) image data seemed well present in the shadows as in the highlights. But, the ultimate goal of an image shot on film is undoubtedly the wet print in the darkroom. Only on the final print we can make a judgment that has a real sense and evaluate details such as definition, grain, and so on.

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